Shabbath

 •  Comments (0)



Shabbath is the Jewish day of rest. It is the most important celebration of Judaism.

In the story of the creation in Genesis, we can read that in six days, God created the heavens and the earth and that He rested the seventh day.

Shabbath is then the day of God, a gift of God to His people Israel as it is written:
For six days you may perform all your works, but the seventh day is a complete Sabbath, holy to the L-RD ... it is an eternal sign that in six days, the L-RD made heaven and earth, and on the seventh day he rested. -Exodus 31:15-17

By observing Shabbath, the Jewish people first recognizes that God created every things and secondly obeys to God's commandment of remembering and guarding the Shabbath, as it is prescribed in the Torah in these terms:

Exodus 20:8: "Remember the Shabbath day to keep it holy" (Zakhor eth Yom haShabbath leQadsho). and Deteronomy 5:12: "Observe the Shabbath day to keep it holy" (Shamor eth Yom haShabbath leQadsho).


In Jewish families, the preparation of Shabbath begins friday afternoon: the home is cleaned, the meals prepared, etc. and everyone dress up to welcome Shabbath.

For welcoming Shabbath, the woman of the home will begin by lighting candles of Shabbath, infusing the home physical and spiritual light.



Learn more about Shabbath by following the links below.


Lighting candles
Celebrating Shabbath
The 39 forbidden works
1. Sowing
2. Plowing
3. Reaping
4. Binding sheaves
5. Threshing
6. Winnowing
7. Selecting
8. Grinding
9. Sifting
10. Kneading
11. Baking
12. Shearing wool
13. Washing wool
14. Beating wool
15. Dyeing wool
16. Spinning
17. Weaving
18. Making two loops
19. Weaving two threads
20. Separating two threads
21. Tying
22. Untying
23. Sewing two stitches
24. Tearing
25. Trapping
26. Slaughtering
27. Flaying
28. Salting meat
29. Curing hide
30. Scraping hide
31. Cutting hide up
32. Writing two letters
33. Erasing two letters
34. Building
35. Tearing a building down
36. Extinguishing a fire
37. Kindling a fire
38. Hitting with a hammer
39. Taking an object from the private domain to the public, or transporting an object in the public domain.
(Mishnah Shabbat, 7:2)
Havadala-closure of Shabbath
The Havdalah service marks the end of Shabbat.
It should be performed on Saturday after nightfall when three stars are already visible in the sky.
For the precise time which variates according to places and seasons, it is correct to consult the calendar.

The ritual of Havdalah is performed with wine, spices, and a candle with at least two wicks.

We light the candle of Havdala using an existing fire and then,

1. We tell the blessing over a full cup of wine:
Barukh Attah Hashem, Eloheinu, melekh ha-olam borei peri hagafen (Amen).
Blessed are You, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe Who creates the fruit of the vine (Amen)

We do not drink immediately.

If we do not have wine, we can also use grape juice or beer, then the previous blessing becomes:
Barukh Attah Hashem, Eloheinu, melekh ha'olam shehakol nih'yeh bid'varo (Amen)
Blessed are You, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe Who made all things exist through His word (Amen)

2. We tell the blessing over spices:
Barukh Attah Hashem, Eloheinu, melekh ha'olam, borei minei v'samim (Amen)
Blessed are You, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe, W ho creates varieties of spices (Amen)

3. We tell the blessing over fire:

Barukh Attah Hashem, Eloheinu, melekh ha'olam borei m'orei ha'eish (Amen)
Blessed are You, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe Who creates the light of the fire (Amen)

After the blessing is recited, hold your hands up to the flame with curved fingers, so you can see the shadow of your fingers on your palms. This is done because it would be improper to recite a blessing for something and then not use the thing.

4. Havdalah

The havdalah (separation) blessing itself comes at the end and is also recited over the wine.
Barukh Attah Hashem, Eloheinu, melekh ha'olam hamav'dil bein kodesh l'chol bein or l'choshekh bein Yis'ra'eil la'amim bein yom hash-vi-i l'sheishet yemei hama'aseh Barukh Attah Hashem, hamav'dil bein kodesh le-khol (Amen).
Blessed are You, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe Who separates between sacred and secular between light and darkness, between Israel and the nations between the seventh day and the six days of labor Blessed are You, Lord, who separates between sacred and secular. (Amen)

We drink the wine after this blessing.

Havdala marks the separation between Shabbath and the new week, between sacred and secular.

We can then extinguish the flame of the havdala candle using few drops of wine .

Shabbath has gone, we say shavua Tov (good week) to one another.

Links on Shabbath




 






 
Beth Yeshourun Please, visit the Beth Yeshourun's website